June 24, 2024
Why Mount Everest Mountaineers' Bodies Are Left Wherever They Die

Why Mount Everest Mountaineers’ Bodies Are Left Wherever They Die

For climbers who are unable to return home, the mountain serves as their final resting place.

The death of mountaineer Cheruiyot Kirui is being accepted by Kenyans with heavy hearts.

Without additional oxygen, Cheruiyot was embarking on a risky expedition to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

On Tuesday, his body was discovered a few meters below the top of Mount Everest.

“With profound sadness, we share the news of Kenyan mountaineer Cheruiyot Kirui’s passing on Mt Everest. His body was found a few meters below the summit point of Mt Everest,” Everest Today said in a statement.

Cheruiyot worked in finance. He had made fifteen ascents to the summit of Mount Kenya.

The fact that most mountaineers’ bodies may never be found makes it a more agonizing experience for their friends and relatives.

Why People Leave Their Bodies Atop Mount Everest.

Why Mount Everest Mountaineers' Bodies Are Left Wherever They Die
A collage of a dead body and Kenya Mountaineer Cheruiyot Kirui

Situated above 8,000 meters (26,247 feet), Mount Everest is referred to as the “death zone”.

One of the world’s deadliest mountains, it is situated in Tibet and Nepal in Asia.

For climbers who are unable to return home, the mountain serves as their final resting place.

According to an article published by Ultimate Kilimanjaro, the mountaineers must contend with bitter cold, dangerously low oxygen levels, and hostile weather.

The extreme weather and high altitude on Everest present major challenges to recovery efforts, according to the Ultimate Kilimanjaro.

They claim that moving frozen bodies—which can weigh over 300 pounds (136 kg)—is extremely risky, inefficient, and impractical.

Because Camp 2, at 21,000 feet (6,400 meters), is the highest elevation at which helicopters can consistently land, they are an exception to help with the recovery process.

This is because of the air density on the higher slopes, which makes it impossible for helicopters to fly.

Over a certain altitude on Mount Everest, there aren’t enough air molecules for the rotors to produce enough lift.

In 2013, during calm weather, the highest helicopter rescue on Everest was carried out at a height of 25,590 feet (7,800 meters).

Most families are unable to recover the bodies of their loved ones due to these conditions and the high cost of body recovery.

Bodily recovery missions on Everest can be very expensive and demand a significant amount of resources and experience.

The bulk of fallen climbers are still on the mountain where they perished, according to the Ultimate Kilimanjaro, even though some bodies have been identified and moved for a variety of reasons.

The Rainbow Valley is the region below Everest along the northeastern ridge route of the mountain.

It is recognized by the vibrant down jackets left behind by abandoned climbers that litter the area.

According to the Ultimate Kilimanjaro, about 200 dead bodies are still on Mount Everest and about 300 people have died while climbing the mountain.

Why Mount Everest Mountaineers’ Bodies Are Left Wherever They Die

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